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Posts for: December, 2018

By Cape Vista Dental
December 24, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures

Wisdom ToothNo one looks forward to having a tooth pulled, but it's always been a common practice in dental offices around the world. Fortunately, tooth extractions are far less common than they used to be, thanks to advancements in dental procedures and a better understanding of how the teeth function. However, there are still instances where extraction is necessary, and Dr. Andrew Yoon of Cape Vista Dental in Orange City, Florida, is an expert in the procedure. Read below to learn if you have a condition that may require this treatment.

Trauma

A car accident or a sports injury can cause tooth loss, but sometimes the tooth will shift out of place yet remain attached to the jaw. In some cases, your Orange City dentist can repair this displacement and avoid an extraction, however, if too much time passes or the nerves and blood supply have been irreparably severed, the tooth may need to be extracted. Fortunately, you have many options for replacing a missing tooth at Cape Vista Dental!

Breakage

If you're chewing or biting into something and feel a breaking or cracking sensation in one of your teeth, it's definitely time to see your Orange City dentist. Although minor damage can be repaired with a crown, sometimes the tooth will sustain damage into the root, which can be quite painful and requires extraction. This is often the case when a tooth with a prior restoration, such as a root canal or filling, is affected.

Orthodontia

One of the most common reasons extractions are performed in modern dental offices is to accommodate the movement of teeth while wearing braces. Removing teeth that impede the straightening process is a relatively common occurrence for adolescent patients.

Concerned? Give Us a Call!

As with all of the treatments and procedures we offer at Cape Vista Dental, your safety and comfort are priority number one when it comes to extractions. Contact our office in Orange City, Florida, by calling (386) 774-0125 to schedule an appointment with Dr. Andrew Yoon today!


ProtectingPrimaryTeethfromDecayHelpsEnsureFutureDentalHealth

A baby’s teeth begin coming in just a few months after birth—first one or two in the front, and then gradually the rest of them over the next couple of years. We often refer to these primary teeth as deciduous—just like trees of the same description that shed their leaves, a child’s primary teeth will all be gone by around puberty.

It’s easy to think of them as “minor league,” while permanent teeth are the real superstars. But although they don’t last long, primary teeth play a big role in a person’s dental health well into their adult years.

Primary teeth serve two needs for a child: enabling them to eat, speak and smile in the present; but more importantly, helping to guide the developing permanent teeth to erupt properly in the future. Without them, permanent teeth can come in misaligned, affecting dental function and appearance and increasing future treatment costs.

That’s why we consider protecting primary teeth from decay a necessity for the sake of future dental health. Decay poses a real threat for children, especially an aggressive form known as early childhood caries (ECC). ECC can quickly decimate primary teeth because of their thinner enamel.

There are ways you can help reduce the chances of ECC in your child’s teeth. Don’t allow them to drink throughout the day or to go to sleep at night with a bottle or “Sippy” cup filled with milk, formula, or even juice. These liquids can contain sugars and acids that erode enamel and accelerate decay. You should also avoid sharing eating utensils with a baby or even kissing them on the mouth to avoid the transfer of disease-causing bacteria.

And even before teeth appear, start cleaning their gums with a clean, wet cloth right after feeding. After teeth appear, begin brushing and flossing to reduce plaque, the main trigger for tooth decay. And you should also begin regular dental visits no later than their first birthday. Besides teeth cleanings and checkups for decay, your dentist has a number of measures like sealants or topical fluoride to protect at-risk teeth from disease.

Helping primary teeth survive to their full lifespan is an important goal in pediatric dentistry. It’s the best strategy for having healthy permanent teeth and a bright dental health future.

If you would like more information on tooth decay in children, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Do Babies Get Tooth Decay?


By Cape Vista Dental
December 01, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral hygiene   braces   orthodontics  
MakeEffortstoProtectYourTeethfromDiseaseWhileWearingBraces

Orthodontic treatment is a big investment. But given the benefits for future good health and a more attractive smile, it's well worth it.

In the here and now, though, braces wearers face a different threat to their dental well-being — dental disease. Wearing braces can actually increase the risk of disease and make it more difficult to fight.

Tooth decay and periodontal (gum) disease, the two most common forms of dental disease, usually arise from plaque, a thin film of bacteria and food particles on tooth surfaces. The bacteria produce acid, which erodes enamel and makes the teeth susceptible to decay. Certain bacteria can also infect the gums and eventually weaken their attachment to teeth. Thorough brushing and flossing everyday removes this disease-triggering plaque buildup.

But braces' hardware can make brushing and flossing more difficult. The brackets attached to the teeth and wires laced through them make it more difficult for floss and brush bristles to access all the areas around the teeth. Plaque can build up in certain spots; it's estimated braces wearers have two to three times the plaque of a person not wearing braces. Acid can also remain in contact with some of the enamel surface for too long.

It's important, therefore, if you wear braces to make a concerted effort to brush and floss thoroughly. Besides improving technique and taking more time, you might also consider additional aids. You can obtain toothbrushes specially designed for use with braces, as well as floss holders or threaders that make it easier to access between teeth. Another flossing alternative is an oral irrigator that sprays water under pressure between teeth is an alternative to flossing.

As a precaution against acid damage, we can boost enamel protection with additional fluoride applied to your teeth. We may also prescribe antibacterial rinses to keep the bacteria population low.

Above all, be sure to look out for signs of disease like swollen or bleeding gums or pain. As soon as you sense something out of the ordinary, be sure and contact us.

If you would like more information on keeping your teeth disease-free while wearing braces, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Caring for Teeth During Orthodontic Treatment.”